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'Banned' Air Jordans have slightly different history than Nike's narrative

Le 8 mars à  04:47
Rubriques : Air Jordans

Nike's story of the black-and-red Air Jordan 1 makes for sexy marketing: When then-NBA commissioner David Stern saw Michael Jordan wearing the shoes in a 1984 preseason game, he banned them.

Nike and Jordan Brand are pumping that story line as they prepare for the Saturday release of the Air Jordan 1 Retro High OG Banned, a throwback to the classic that sneaker heads have nicknamed the "Bred."

But the Bred was not the shoe that was banned. It was the Ship.

Let us explain.

Air Jordan sneaker design: A brief history
A brief history of the design inspiration behind Air Jordans.
As original Air Jordan logo designer Peter Moore recalls, Nike and Jordan's marketing team at ProServ met that August in Washington, D.C., and planned the launch of his first shoe, but it wouldn't be ready until November. Jordan needed something of Nike's to wear during training camp and preseason and the brain trust wanted it to be red and black, as they intended the first shoe's color scheme to be, to make him stand out from other players.

At the time, however, NBA shoes had to be mostly white, and Stern "banned the red and black because he proclaimed that the red and black were not the color of the Bulls — the shoes didn't meet the uniform standard," said Moore, who is now founder of What'a Ya Think, a Portland, Ore.-based. branding consulting company. "They were the colors of the Bulls, they just were lacking white, but you don't argue with David Stern at that point."

During the regular season, Jordan alternated between red-and-white Ships and Air Jordan 1 Retro Banned , nicknamed "Chicagos."

So how have the red-and-black Ships and Breds come to be confused?

"The Air Ship was basically colored up to look like the shoe that was coming," Moore said. "Those shoes were probably specially made for him to wear, and they were what his Air Jordans would look like once they came. Nobody would know the difference unless they had the shoes in front of them."



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The True Story Behind the Banned Air Jordan 1

Le 7 mars à  05:13
Rubriques : Air Jordans

We've been led to believe that the black and red colorway of the Air Jordan 1 was banned 31 years ago. But was it really? The Air Jordan 1 is a mysterious shoe that originally released in all sorts of colorways, and in order to gather the history and evolution of the brand, we must first look back at its roots.

As the story goes, Michael Jordan was, or would be fined, $5,000 per game if he wore a certain pair of red and black Nike basketball shoes, as evidenced by 2011's "Banned" Air Jordan 1 High. Per the "uniformity of uniform rule" set by the NBA,

A player must wear shoes that not only matched their uniforms, but matched the shoes worn by their teammates."

At the time, red and black was much more rebellious than plain black and white shoes, and first-year NBA commissioner David Stern "threw them out of the game." Legend has it that MJ continued wearing the pair anyway, while Nike footed the bill. Does this story sound familiar to you? Let's take a look at an interview conducted by legendary late night talk show host, David Letterman. Fast forward to 4:48.

Here is a letter written by then-NBA Executive Vice President, Russ Granik, addressed to Nike Vice President, Rob Strasser. It states that Michael Jordan wore a certain pair of Nike basketball shoes that violated the league's rules and procedures on or around October 18, 1984.

There are so many questions to be asked. For one, how many games did MJ wear the Black/Red Air Jordan 1? And did Nike really pay said imposed fines? And here's the biggest question: Was the Black/Red Air Jordan 1 even the right sneaker that was first "banned" by the NBA?

No, and here's why.

I've had regular discussions with people on the matter. In particular, bigbostrong on Instagram, who has provided detailed pictures of Air Jordan history, as well as our friends from Australia, Adam Ryan and Aaron Stehn—both of whom who run a popular podcast on inallairness.com. A mutual colleague of theirs, Adam Howes, runs bullsonparade.me and does the same, but with all focus on the rich historical events of Michael Jordan and Chicago Bulls history.

We have already scratched the surface as to what MJ first wore during his rookie campaign, which is identified as the Nike Air Ship—a mysterious shoe that has yet to be retroed. To my knowledge, Jordan wore three colorways of the Air Ship: White/Natural Grey, White/Red and Black/Red. And that Black/Red version of the Nike Air Ship is the actual sneaker that was banned, not the Air Jordan 1. Jordan did however had a PE edition of the Air Ship, which read "Air Jordan" on the heels.

Michael Jordan Air Ship

Close-up shot of the "Air Jordan" PE Air Ship - Image via Getty Bettmann / Contributor
Here is Michael in a 1984 preseason game against the New York Knicks wearing the Black/Red Nike Air Ship. The game was played on October 18, 1984 at Madison Square Garden. It was the 6th preseason game the Bulls had played, and they were going into the game with a 4-1 record. A few days earlier on October 15, 1984, the two teams played each other at Glens Falls, NY some 200 miles north of Madison Square Garden. The NBA notified Nike and/or the Bulls that the black and red sneaker from the October 18 game broke the "uniformity of uniform rule." He would immediately have to stop wearing the colorway on court.

In this YouTube video, you can see Michael wearing the Black/Red Nike Air Ship during practice at Madison Square Garden from a interview conducted on October 18, 1984. Fast forward to 0:26. The game following is the regular season debut at Madison Square Garden on November 8, 1984 with Michael wearing the White/Red Nike Air Ship.

There have been no pictures surfaced of Michael Jordan ever wearing the Black/Red Air Jordan 1 in an NBA game. I've been analyzing this mythical story for a some years now, and have even challenged our Jordan forum to provide a picture and/or video of Michael wearing the shoes. I've been presented with all sorts of unique attempts such as the 1985 NBA Slam Dunk competition, to Patrick Ewing in a one-on-one match up, to screenshots of Michael from the "Just For Kicks" documentary of 2005.

Let's break down each attempt. The 1985 NBA dunk contest doesn't count since it wasn't an NBA sanctioned game. It does however suggest that the NBA may have again warned the Bulls superstar and Nike for breaking the "uniformity of uniform rule." Referencing back to the letter, it was dated February 25, 1985. All Star festivities began on the weekend of the 10th. It may suggest that a second warning did take place, but no evidence has surfaced regarding any imposed fines the NBA may have issued—something we can perhaps research at a later time.

The matchup between Jordans for all and Ewing was for the cover of the November 1985 issue of Inside Sports magazine, and utilized for promotion of the 1985-86 NBA season. It simulated the matchup between the previous Rookie of the Year (Jordan) versus the potential (and eventual) Rookie of the Year (Ewing). Jordan continued to wear the White/Red Air Jordan 1 in the 1985-86 NBA season, before and after his foot injury.

The documentary Just For Kicks again attempted to align the notion that Jordan was fined for wearing the shoes. But there has yet to be evidence by Nike or the NBA that proves that the violation ever took place. These screen captures from the documentary were modified. Photos of the game were taken from the first round of the 1986 NBA playoffs against the Boston Celtics in which Michael scored a playoff record 63 points. It still stands as a record today.

Keep in mind that the uniform style worn during Michael's rookie season were different. The road jerseys consisted of black script lettering for Chicago along the chest and the home jerseys with the Bulls team name in red. After the 1984-85 NBA season, the Bulls sported a new uniform style which is similar to what Jordan wore throughout his illustrious career.

So there you have it—the true story behind of the actual "banned" sneaker. It was not the Air Jordan 1 banned , but indeed the Nike Air Ship in the Black/Red colorway. Perhaps someday we'll come to understand how Nike strategically rolled out the "banned" campaign. We can only wonder if we'll ever get a retro of the Nike Air Ship—which seems like a possiblity after it was finally offically acknowledged by Jordan Brand in 2014.

Whether or not the Air Jordan 1 was banned, the myth is most definitely a part of sneaker history, and the precursor to what Jordan Brand is today.



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adidas harden vol 2 red white performance review

Le 6 mars à  03:32
Rubriques : Air Jordans

The Harden Vol 2 is a nice basketball shoe off the court, but it did not impress me on the court.

Let’s cut straight to the chase: the traction on the Harden Vol 2 let your boy down something fierce. The traction performed well right out of the box…for about two days.

After the rubber breaks in the traction will decline full speed ahead. On dirty courts, I was wiping more than I like to, and these things pick up dust like nobody’s business. The traction had me out there like I was competing in the Winter Olympics – figure skating style.

On a clean court, the traction was solid. As long as the court conditions are good you will be fine.

I’m sure you guys already know what I’m about to say right? You guessed it: Booost is life…well, a different life, because this setup is a bit different from other Boost basketball shoes.

This year, a much thicker piece of Boost is implemented in the Harden Vol 2. However, don’t expect this thicker boost to be as bouncy as other performance models that we’ve dealt with before. I am not saying the Boost isn’t good, it is, I’m just that it seems like adidas went with a more impact protection focused setup this year. It was great for impact protection and I’d like to see this setup on more releases in the future.

Materials are pretty basic on the Harden Vol 2. ForgeFiber, a reinforced textile mesh is used at the forefoot while synthetic paneling makes up the rear. The mesh gets its strength from TPU-coated fibers, and they add support to the mesh — it does a great job at containing the foot. While the materials are pretty basic — it’s all synthetic here — they keep the weight of the upper down.

The fit on the Harden Vol 2 is true to size. Wide-footers may be able to go true to size but I would try on in-store. The shoe fits pretty snug and at the midfoot there’s an elastic-like band that may cause discomfort for some people. It is also an ounce heavier than the Harden Vol 1 (just a note for people that prefer lightweight

Support on James Harden’s second signature was pretty good. With an outrigger that is as wide and as thick as the one used here you’re bound to get good support. The wide base here is like standing on a plank of Boost foam.

The one-piece bootie does a great job at containing the foot while providing you with a compression-like feel — I love how these felt on-foot. The mesh was strong enough to support every move I made on the court and keep me atop the footbed with no issues.

I did have a bit of an issue with the heel lockdown, but once I customized the lacing system to my liking — those holes aren’t for decoration — I was able to get my heel locked into the back of the shoe.

Unless you play on crispy clean courts the Harden Vol 2 Red White isn’t a shoe that I would recommend people buy because there are a bunch of better options on the market. The traction was just too inconsistent for me to enjoy in these.

However, I do recommend this Harden if you want to rock something swaggy with tons of Boost. I think it looks incredible worn casually.



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The Nike PG 2 is the latest to be deconstructed

Le 5 mars à  03:58
Rubriques : Air Jordans

The Nike PG 2 is the latest to be deconstructed by the good folks over at 2018jordans.com.

Yes, it pains us to look at images such as these as well. The fact that these shoes could have gone to someone in need of a new pair of sneakers makes images like this hard to see. However, chopping them up is for educational purposes and taking apart the shoes long after they’ve been used doesn’t do anyone any good as this type of information should be available as soon as possible.

With so many product descriptions being wrong or outdated nowadays, we feel this type of thing is important — which is why we support the folks over at 2018jordans.com. So, we feel your pain. Just know that we’re at least learning something.

The profile shot is a simple one; it shows us everything without saying anything at all — where the cushion is located, and how thick/thin it is. You’re also able to see how padded the interior of the shoe is, whether there is a heel to toe drop, which there almost always is, and how significant it is. Beautiful. Isn’t it?

Layers. So many wonderful layers. Here you can see the partial internal bootie, which makes it much easier to get the shoe on and off, and the upper’s build and external Adaptive Fit forefoot straps. The heel padding sticks out to us the most; that area of the shoe was really well done and features lots of nicely sculpted padding for comfort and proper fit.

Reinforcing soft textiles when they’re placed in stress zones is essential, not only for the longevity of the material but also for the safety of the player wearing the shoe — no matter the player’s skill level.

In my performance review I had stated that this Zoom Air setup felt as close to being Unlocked Zoom as possible without it actually being Unlocked Zoom. What this image shows is that it’s exactly like Unlocked Zoom Air with the exception of a moderator plate.

You can also see one of the reasons why the heel portion of the foam midsole is more comfortable than that of the Nike PG 1. This heel section of the midsole is cored out around the impact zone which allows for the foam to compress a lot more. This, coupled with a slightly altered foam density, made for a very comfortable and well balanced ride during our testing.

Don’t get too excited regarding cushioning; the forefoot Zoom Air unit is 10mm thick according to Nike. Yes, this one is over 11mm, which makes us think that quality control isn’t perfect and there will be variations and/or defects within production runs of footwear. This isn’t a Nike problem though, it’s normal for any company manufacturing something at such a high volume.

Torsional support comes in the form of this tiny TPU bar, which is now the norm for most models. It works just fine, but definitely could be better or more substantial.

There looks to be an 8mm drop from the heel to toe. Some don’t mind the drop while others loath it. Below is a side by side comparison of the PG 1 and PG 2. The Nike PG 2 is definitely an upgrade in the cushion department. Nothing about how the shoe feels on-foot and on-court makes you feel as if you’re wearing a budget model — despite its $110 price tag.

We hope you enjoyed the detailed look and breakdown of the Nike PG 2 deconstructed. Feel free to share your thoughts on the dissection below in the comment section.



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A Detailed Look at The Upcoming Air Jordan 32 UNC and NRG

Le 2 mars à  03:01
Rubriques : Air Jordans

So far, we’ve reported on the Air Jordan 32 ‘UNC’ and Air Jordan 32 Low ‘Michigan’ PEs. It should only be a matter of time before more Nike/Jordan Brand NCAA programs unveil their PEs.

Like the Air Jordan 32 ‘UNC’ , this Air Jordan 32 Low rides atop a marbled outsole and flaunts its program’s logo on the tongues. That huge M is set off with a strong heel counter pattern, a “Go Blue” patch behind the tongue, and bright yellow threads in the College Navy upper. “Go Blue” is also featured beneath the Amarillo semi-translucent rubber outsole.

Dressed in the usual University Blue, hits of College Navy break up the familiar hue. Finally, we’ve got something besides a white midsole, and while the marbling may not be for everyone, it is certainly a new look. The shoe features several unique details like aggressive heel panels, six rings for each of the Tar Heels’ championships, and “TAR” under the heels (ha ha).

Jordan Brand released the super-limited lifestyle Air Jordan 32 ‘NRG’ model. While the shoe has already sold out — and popped up on eBay for $1,000 and up — we’ve got you covered with a detailed look at this gem.

The Air Jordan 32 ‘NRG’ is limited to just 323 pairs and ditches the performance-based Flyknit upper for rich, premium leather. The shoe also flaunts raised alligator detailing along the wrap-around panels that provides a more luxurious look — and you’re paying for premium aesthetics (the shoe retails for $200).

Staying true to its inspiration, the Air Jordan 2 — which was made in Italy — the Air Jordan 32 ‘NRG’ pays tribute to the Italian flag with red and green hits, as well as supple leathers. Even the Air Jordan 2 eyelets have made an appearance on this lifestyle model.

The Air Jordan 32 Low ‘Michigan’ will release at 2018jordans.com in limited numbers for $160 on March 9. It will release alongside the Air Jordan 32 ‘UNC’.



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Nike Kyrie 4 Performance Reviews

Le 1 mars à  04:32
Rubriques : Air Jordans

Time to get my Uncle Drew on and get buckets in the Kyrie 4.

Traction – Multi-directional herringbone was implemented very well in this shoe. The traction pattern is aggressive enough for those who change direction quite often. There was some break-in time until the outsole really started gripping the floor but once you’ve done that you’re in for an awesome ride because it gets better with time.

You’ll occasionally have to wipe due to dusty floors but that’s the norm. I didn’t find any particular issues with lateral movements playing on top of the key or working down on the block against bigs. Everything will work well no matter the position you play.

Cushion – I’m always a sucker for a softer cushion setup because I’m a bigger player and the Nike Kyrie 4 showed showed vast improvement from its predecessor. A slightly larger 11mm thick heel Zoom unit provides nice support for those that need it but the biggest upgrade is implementing Cushlon. While it isn’t as bouncy as some people would like, it offers a very well-balanced cushion feedback while providing ample court-feel — something which Kyrie prefers due to his unique movements.

As a big man I enjoyed the setup. Would I prefer full-length Zoom or segmented Zoom in the forefoot and heel? Sure I would, however, I don’t have many complaints because the cushioning setup here offered just enough without my knees or back feeling most of the impact.

Materials – Engineered mesh is used from midfoot to the forefoot while suede is used at the heel, as well as the toewrap. Additionally, the outsole is comprised of pretty durable rubber.

High-end basketball shoes in the ’90s were priced around the $120 mark, so being that this is still considered a budget-friendly model at the same $120 price point mark is great (especially because that $120 in ’95 is $198 in today’s money). With the the Kyrie 4 you get a mixture of awesome materials. As a customer, you have to be excited.

Fit – Generally I’d say true to size — although wider-footers might need a half size up — so definitely try them on in-store. The Kyrie 4 is slightly on the narrow side due to the outsoles “teeth” extending up onto the upper. Lockdown wasn’t an issue because once laced tight you’re pretty much ready for battle. Like its predecessors, the Kyrie series has always been solid from a fit standpoint.

Support – Support generally comes directly from the fit of the shoe. In the Kyrie 4 the “teeth” keep you stabilized while the internal heel counter keeps you on the footbed. In addition to the the wider base because of the sculpted outsole structure, the soft rubber, heel Zoom, and lacing setup hold you in place without concern.

Overall – The Kyrie 4 is one of Nike’s best-performing signature shoe to date. It’s a well-rounded shoe that works with any player in a now positionless game. From the materials, support, and fit to its decent price point, the Kyrie 4 excels in every category.

I’m hoping that as the series evolves the Cushlon gets softer and more responsive (think Podulon/Cushlon in the Jordan 1 series) becuase that would really benefit a guy who plays more of a Draymond Green/LeBron-esque type of game like myself.

Ben Nethongkome, the designer of this latest model in the Kyrie series, really hit the mark. I am looking forward to the Kyrie 5, and the upcoming budget model. Great job by Nike.



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Air Jordan 13 'Bred' Performance Review

Le 28 février à  04:10
Rubriques : Air Jordans

The Air Jordan 13 OG Bred colorway of the Air Jordan 13 is coming back recently ,Jordan Brand’s cool initiative to start their own blog has given us exclusive interviews with celebrities close to the brand and first looks at upcoming retros. As a sneaker enthusiast ,I like the Bred very much . we are talking  Bred  today .

Air Jordan 13 features a black leather upper along with the signature mesh detailing on the side panels which comes with 3M detailing. True Red suede is then placed on the ankle/heel .

Jordan 13 OG Bred is a stack of these elements, the taste of leather, exquisite design, and Black classic colors, but in addition to the the 3m detailing . It is not only a classic sneakers ,but also you can see the obvious modern elements .

I am tall 185cm , weight : 82KG ,  now we will test it .

For the material ,  It is improving the ventilation. I can feel snug even playing longer. High tensile threads are used throughout the lateral side of the shoe and provide you with a comfortable fit ,But for summer , it is a little hot .

For cushion , the midsole utilized the Zoom unite ,there is no hesitation when jump and running . the feedback of bounce is excellent ,so I can moving fast .it is not change the effect of changing the upper material ,but I still feel a little difference .Especially for the continues jumping  ,it is improve the cushioning actually . I feel great .

For supporting ,Lockdown is awesome, plain and simple. After a short break-in period the leather will soften up a bit.you’ll be busting moves with more confidence than before.

As a result of  midsole , I feeling the midsole is stable ,that is easy to  moves faster when running basketball shoes .

Overall ,  many years passed ,but not change the status of sneakers .the design and the cushioning  and supporting is excellent .There are some minor setbacks in terms of material quality but for the most part I think these still performed just as good as some of today’s Air Jordan 13 sneakers. How do you thinking it ?

 



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adidas Harden Vol 2 performance review

Le 27 février à  02:48

The next chapter of James Harden’s signature line has been put to the test and that means that the adidas Harden Vol 2 performance review is finally here.

Unfortunately, the traction on the Harden Vol 2 just wasn’t as good as that of the original. A re-engineered rendition of the Harden Vol 1’s data-driven pattern was utilized in the Harden Vol 2 and it didn’t pan out the way I had hoped.

I never received the same bite that I had experienced on the Harden Vol 1, despite the rubber compound being nearly identical between the two sneakers. When it gripped I was very pleased, however, I wasn’t pleased the majority of the time while playing in the shoe.

Excessive dust collection is a major issue for this pattern and keeping it free of debris will be your number one priority on the court rather than playing. Even in an NBA practice facility — a nearly pristine court — I wasn’t getting much bite and I always felt like I was going to slip if I put too much pressure on an area of the outsole with the compacted pattern.

I was pretty disappointed in this category because I loved the Harden Vol 1, but I can’t say the same for the Harden Vol 2 — and it was one of my most anticipated sequels to a great first model.

Boost is back and thicker than ever before on the Harden Vol 2. Surprisingly, I never felt too high off the ground or unstable. Packing more Boost pellets into the midsole made it firmer, creating more stability while also increasing overall impact protection.

Some may not enjoy this setup because it won’t give you that bouncy Boost feeling, but you don’t always have to feel something working — as long as it actually works. Luckily, Boost actually works, and works really well, so if you were interested in a shoe that provides you with stability, court feel, and tons of impact protection then the Harden Vol 2 might be for you.

While I was initially disappointed that a premium or raw material was left off of the Harden Vol 2, once I started playing in it I never once thought, “Some premium leather would enhance my overall experience right now.”

The textile mesh at the forefoot required no break-in time while the additional stitching throughout increased the material’s strength quite a bit. I was very impressed by this and wondered why we’re just starting to see this implemented when we’ve had mesh on basketball shoes for a number of years now. Great work by adidas for adding this onto the mesh.

It’ll be interesting to see how this material wears long term because I’ve seen so many players with a ripped lateral forefoot on their engineered mesh sneakers. If this small modification allows the upper’s material to last the life of the shoe then it’s a worthy addition.

I know most have been unimpressed by the synthetic rear panel of the shoe, but it works on-court so I can’t complain. Yes, I’d love for this panel to be where the raw materials seen in the first model are brought into the mix, but this is what we have to work with. This panel is very strong and durable so containment isn’t an issue. Longevity shouldn’t be an issue either.

So, while you may be disappointed by the materials used, you shouldn’t be disappointed by their performance.

True to size. Wide footers, try them on in-store and then shop online. There is an elastic-like band where the mesh and synthetic layer meet that doesn’t stretch much. I love how it fits and feels, but wide footers and those with high arches may not. For everyone else, I love the fit going true to size.

Lockdown was really good as well, and it was a tad better than lockdown in the Harden Vol 1. The rear panel is strong and wraps around the midfoot nicely. Meanwhile, that band I mentioned (where the two materials meet) keeps the forefoot snug and secure.

The internal bootie feels like neoprene and acts like one as well; you can feel it wrapped around your heel and ankle — but not in a suffocating way. It’s somewhat like the Dame 4’s compression collar but stretchier, so it’s easier to get on and off, and it’s able to adapt a bit to different heel/ankle shapes and sizes.

The Harden Vol 2 Red was very supportive despite riding so high off the floor in the heel. Its Boost platform is very wide and you actually sit within it just a bit so you never really feel as high off the ground as you actually are. The TPU-wrapped forefoot ensured the Boost’s stability in this section while also acting as an outrigger.

At the heel, there is a very strong internal heel counter and that large exaggerated rubber piece from the outsole; these make the heel one of the most supportive aspects of the shoe. Lastly, the torsional plate is alive and well and even extends into the forefoot to act as a TPU spring plate. For a Guard shoe, the support is here and shouldn’t let you down.



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Under Armour Heat Seeker Performance Review

Le 22 février à  03:33
Rubriques : Air Jordans

The more things stay the same, the more they change. Wait, that isn’t right. The Under Armour Heat Seeker keeps some things from the past while completely re-doing others. What stayed, what didn’t, and how does it all come together? Let’s do this…

Speaking of staying the same, the Heat Seeker uses the exact same midsole and outsole as the Drive 4. Not a bad idea when it comes to the traction, as this is some of the best herringbone on the market. The blades are thick and widely spaced, which means plenty of surface area to grab and plenty of space to push dust out of the way.

The soles were squeaky and loud and stopped on a dime in any direction with no hesitation.There was no sliding on any of the three indoor courts I played on — whether dust was present or not. The flex grooves under the ball of the foot are still there and lead to an awesome transition feel, keeping the forefoot from becoming too stiff and rigid.

Durability? It’s weird — on the Curry 4, playing outdoors was no issue. The herringbone is good for multiple wears on smooth or rough surfaces and the grooves are deep for longevity. However, the Heat Seeker showed signs of fraying on the edges of the forefoot and heel from just indoor use after four days of playing. Nothing major, just some slight wearing, and the actual herringbone was still intact. It’s something to keep an eye on.

Again, some things stay the same. No, that isn’t HOVR — be patient — but an EVA foam carrier and forefoot with Micro G in the heel puck. Not a bad setup, but when HOVR is on the market in the running line, it makes it hard to accept the EVA forefoot found here.

On the plus side, the ride is low and the midsole responds to every move you throw at it. Impact absorption coming down from jumpers is good, but has a dead feeling — there’s no bounce-back at all. Again, for playing on your toes and quick movements, the foam never has a sinking feeling to slow you down.

The Micro G in the heel is what we all used to love — soft but responsive, stable, low-riding, and very protective. I have no idea why Micro G is only in the heel, but since we have it there, just enjoy it. The EVA is stable on landings, letting the Micro G bounce back to provide serious pain relief for your joints.

We have change and it is good. This is not Under Armour’s first trip into a knitted upper for basketball (we got the Charged Controller and the Curry 3 that used Threadborne in 2017). However, this is the first shoe that feels like a knitted upper.

The Heat Seeker features an engineered knit upper (no signs of the name Threadborne) with an extended ankle collar. The knit itself is stretchy where it needs to be — over the top of the foot in the lace area, around the ankle — and not stretchy at all on high-stress areas like the lateral forefoot. The containment is serious, which was a huge relief, as some knits don’t hold shape under extreme force. The Heat Seeker is easily one of the most comfortable shoes Under Armour Basketball has ever put out.

Inside that knit upper is a 3/4 length inner sleeve that helps provide the containment. Here is the trick: the laces go through the knitted upper and lace through the sleeve, which has lace straps internally, sewn into the midsole. The sleeve is neoprene, so it will stretch for easy entry, but this also means it wraps your foot and holds you tight.

There is a little bit of fuse over the big toe, but this is nothing that affects feel or flex – it just keeps the knit from wearing on toe drags and gives a little protection if you get stepped on. Plus it adds a nice color hit to break up that forefoot.

Being a knitted upper, fit should be spot on, and it is. There is almost no dead space anywhere in the upper, except for a little extra length in the toebox (I like about a thumb’s width between my toe and the end of the shoe, and these were right on it). If you like to have no space at all at the end of the shoe, you could go a half size down, but true to size worked great. The last feels narrower than the KD 10, more like the Curry 4, so wide footers my need to try these on first.

While the lacing runs through the sleeve and the knit does form-fit, the laces actually don’t add much until the ankle collar. They are hard to tighten, but you really shouldn’t need to do so. The heel is locked in using extra padding, almost like a dog bone, around the area that forms over your foot and takes up most of the empty space. Meanwhile, the lacing system in the ankle runs high enough that any heel slip is stopped when laced tight (again, the one area where the laces can be pulled tight).

There are three reasons the Heat Seeker, a shoe with a knitted upper, feels very supportive: a wide, solid base; a solid midfoot shank; and a fairly solid heel counter.

The midsole sticks out on all sides from the upper, meaning you are coming down stable and solid. Narrow base = tipping. Wide base = stable. From a birds-eye view of the forefoot, you can see the midsole sticking out. When coming around picks or cuts, that solid base will let you plant with no issues and rise up for a shot or push off into your steps with no delay. Better stability means less lag time, which makes you quicker.

The Heat Seeker features the same midfoot shank as the Drive 4 and while it isn’t huge, it is solid and placed perfectly. It stops before the forefoot so there is no added stiffness in that area but under the midfoot you are held up and safe.

The heel counter, at first appearance, seems flimsy and soft. It is, at least on the sides of the heel. The rear is solid, however, and works with the top laces to hold your foot into the rear of the shoe, keeping your foot upright and stable but still allowing the flexibility of the knit to shine.

The Under Armour Heat Seeker is close — thisclose — to being great. It needs HOVR, and we all know it. Under Armour will probably continue to hear “we need HOVR” until it appears on a ball shoe. The one thing missing was great cushioning, but even so, the Heat Seeker is still extremely good.

Great traction, fit was spot on, and support, for a knitted mid-top, was serious. If you are a high-flying, quick guard or play that 3-and-D game, the Heat Seeker will work wonders. Actually, anyone up to extreme big men/post players should be good, and even then, with the solid midsole and support, the shoe may still work on 2018jordans.com

In case you missed it, Dennis Smith Jr. just did arguably the greatest 360 dunk in history in the Heat Seeker. Knowing what DSJ could bring, Under Armour knew it had to bring the, well, heat. Mission accomplished.



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Under Armour Curry 1 Low Performance Reviews

Le 13 février à  09:04

After straight killing the Curry 1, Under Armour could have sat back and waited on the Curry 4 to give us more of what we crave. But like all great signature shoes, a low top was needed, and a low is what we got. Can it hold up to the mid? Or is it an unneeded addition to a new line? You know how we do…

First up, I have to give credit, AGAIN, to Under Armour, for having the foresight to sign an athlete of Steph’s character. Coming off ankle injuries and missed games, it was a gamble to go big with him as your headliner, but I would say so far the gamble has paid well. Steph also took a HUGE gamble, going from King Swoosh to UA, but he has known what we at 2018jordans.com have known for a while – Nike makes great performers, but so do other brands. Give them a shot. Anyway, enough wallowing, let’s roll…

MATERIALS – As we saw in  MOST of the mid colorways, we get Anafoam in the upper. I won’t get too deep, because the review of the mids covers most of the facts covers most of the facts, but Anafoam is a foam backed mesh that forms to your foot as it gets heated. Not saran wrap, but gets comfy. Charged foam in the midsole for cushioning and some fuse touches around high stress areas. Same as the mids.

FIT – Welcome to our first area of change. But change is good. My only other pair of Curry’s are the Dark Matter version, and while they did fit TTS, I will say there was a little dead space in the forefoot. I had heard the MVP’s had changed the fit and were closer to 1:1 than previous versions, but we all know how that release went down. I could tell, on first lace up, that the Low’s fit snugger in the forefoot and midfoot, and the toe box was shallower, really giving the wearer a secure lockdown. I have read some going half size up – I wouldn’t. Length is perfect, and when I tried on a half up the toe flexed in a weird way, popping as it bent. TTS broke in around an hour after wearing them casually and since then no problems. Midfoot is dead on, with the shank plate providing just enough arch support to let you know it’s there without being painful. Heel fit is a problem for playing if you don’t lace tight,  as most low tops are. But just give a little pull and the heel cup locks you in. I still experienced a slight slipping but nothing that made me think I was going to lose a shoe or roll an ankle.

CUSHIONING – The second change in the shoe. You still get Charged Foam, and it is still a little dead feeling compared to Micro G, but instead of the orange Micro G insole, we are given an OrthoLite open-cell insole. On step-in comfort, the Ortho is great, but it will break down quicker than the Micro G. Also, especially in the forefoot, there was a more pronounced bounceback when playing. Whether the formula for the Charged was changed or there was more of it, I don’t know. All I know is, compared to the mids, the lows felt springy and responsive. Heel impact was the same as the mids, with no pain at ALL from off landings or heel slaps.

TRACTION – Same as the mids. And the Clutchfit Drive.


Support/Stability – For a low, VERY stable. The heel cup/counter comes up just high enough to keep you locked in but still allows the range of motion for a low. The cup runs down in to the midfoot tying the support in and taking away any slappy feeling that Under Armour used to be known for in hoops shoes (Black Ice and Bloodline especially). This is the closest to a running shoe UA has put out for basketball, something I love. Also, the wide base in the heel helps keep your ankle upright and the general density of the Charged foam doesn’t compress easily so the threat rolling over is lessened. The forefoot had a large outrigger, but it is set back to under the midfoot up to the pinky toe, not past. Some brands place the outrigger farther forward, making toe-off drag and affecting reaction. By placing it where the Curry does it doesn’t affect the foot flex and really only comes into play when needed. Under the arch, we go back to the large arch support – a TPU bridge that gives the right amount of support without pushing your foot too far up or forward, which lead to foot cramping and fatigue.


OVERALL – A great addition to the young Curry line. If you liked the mids, you will like the lows. If you like the Kobe ad  or IX, you will love the Curry. If you like great cushioning, fit, good traction and transition, you will love the Curry Low. It’s really simple – if you like a great performing low top basketball shoe, you will love the Curry Low. They are EXTREMELY hard to get right now, selling out across the companies like some guy from Chicago played in them. Think about that – two years ago, an Under Armour shoe selling out was ridiculous. Now, you can’t find even the worst colorways of the Curry on shelves. We hear you, Basketball Shoes. No more hiding the goods.



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